OKRs Blog

What Are OKRs? Objectives and key results (OKR) is a strategic framework that defines and tracks objectives and their outcomes. The OKR framework was created by Intel CEO Andy Grove and brought to Google by venture capitalist John Doerr and has been used by several companies including...

Read below as Paul explains the difference between OKRs and Balanced Scorecard during an interview with Perdoo, an OKR software solution. "The Balanced Scorecard has a 20-year history as a strategic management framework used by companies across the world. While it’s still a popular framework, the Balanced...

Why Do Employees Leave? According to a survey of seven thousand LinkedIn members across five countries, the primary reason people leave companies is lack of advancement opportunities. Three times as many people cited that rationale over a poor relationship with their supervisor as cause for leaving....

High-Trust Organizations I recently found a very compelling article in Harvard Business Review focused on the many benefits of increasing trust in the workplace. The author, Paul J. Zak, notes that employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with...

When Crisis Looms In April 1917, as “the war to end all wars,” and its attendant horrors raged on, the United States was in trouble on a different front – the financial battlefield. To raise money necessary to fund the war effort, the Treasury had undertaken...

Simple Without Being Simplistic One of the biggest benefits of the OKRs framework is simplicity. Just four words: Objectives and Key Results, that represent two basic concepts: What do you want to do, and how you’ll know you’ve achieved it? This simple taxonomy is a great...

Will You SCORE With OKR? Here are five principles to keep in mind if you hope to succeed with your OKR implementation. S is for Strategy The first two questions you have to ask yourself when launching an OKRs program is: Why OKRs, and why now? Objectives and...

5 Whys To Wisdom Way back in a 1996 Harvard Business Review article authors Jim Collins and Jerry Porras introduced me to the concept of “5 Whys.”[i] The idea is simple: Whenever you’re faced with a challenging situation, ask the question why five times to reveal...